In January 2020, AAA conducted a survey asking drivers in California and across the U.S. for their opinion about fully automated cars. The results, AAA says, show that automakers need to focus on providing tangible information that addresses the public’s safety concerns. There is also a greater need for news items that directly relate to these vehicles.

Only 12% of survey respondents said they would feel safe riding in a self-driving vehicle, and 28% said they are unsure what to think about such technology. Of course, it will likely take a decade before self-driving cars become a part of everyday life, but AAA emphasizes how necessary it is for the public to support the development of this tech.

Respondents were able to express their concerns in the survey. For example, 57% wondered how liability would work in the event of an accident with a self-driving car. Fifty-one percent want laws to ensure the protection of these cars, and 49% were curious about whether the cars could be easily hacked.

As for what would alleviate their concerns, respondents mentioned several things. Seventy-two percent want to take over for a self-driving car when something goes wrong. Forty-nine percent would feel reassured when self-driving cars pass stringent tests and inspections. Sixty-nine percent want the cars to have a human back-up driver.

Victims of motor vehicle crashes may not have been injured by a self-driving car, but it’s possible that they were injured by a driver of a semi-autonomous vehicle. These cars exhibit certain problems, one of which is that they indirectly cause drivers to become inattentive. It would be important to bring this up if victims file a claim. Finding proof of negligence and negotiating for a settlement, though, are complex processes and may only go smoothly with legal assistance.